Sleeping pills for menopause
hormone therapy

Different types of sleeping pills for penopause

poor sleep quality

Menopause is a tough time for many women. Sleep disturbances and insomnia can be especially frustrating during this period, and often lead to sleep deprivation. This article will discuss the different types of sleeping pills that are available for menopause sufferers, as well as how they might affect your sleep quality.

Menopause and insomnia

Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disturbances associated with menopause. In fact, up to 75% of menopausal women report problems sleeping. This can be due to a variety of factors, including the hormonal changes that occur during menopause, hot flashes and night sweats, anxiety and depression, and difficulty falling or staying asleep.

There are a number of different types of sleeping pills that can be helpful for women experiencing insomnia during menopause. Some of the most common are:

  • Benzodiazepines: These medications, which include drugs like Valium and Xanax, work by depressing the central nervous system and helping you to fall asleep. They are fast-acting, which means that insomnia sufferers will often feel the effects quickly.
  • Nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists: These drugs are another type of sedative hypnotic medication with a similar chemical structure to benzodiazepines, but they produce longer lasting results in most cases. Some examples include Ambien, Lunesta, and Sonata.
  • Melatonin: This natural hormone is produced by the pineal gland in the brain and helps to regulate sleep-wake cycles. Taking melatonin supplements can help to improve insomnia in some people.
  • Antidepressants: While antidepressants are not typically used as sleeping pills, they can be helpful for insomnia sufferers. Tricyclic antidepressants, such as Tofranil and Pamelor, are particularly effective at treating insomnia.

Can menopause cause insomnia?

insomnia menopause

Insomnia can be a symptom of menopause, but it is not always caused by the condition. Insomnia usually occurs as a result of other sleep disturbances or health conditions, including insomnia.

  • The effect of menopause on sleep: The hormonal changes that occur during menopause can lead to insomnia and other sleep disturbances. This is because estrogen levels play a role in maintaining normal sleep patterns. When estrogen levels start to decline, as they do during menopause, it can cause problems falling or staying asleep. Additionally, hot flashes and night sweats can keep you awake by causing you to feel very warm during the night.
  • The effect of insomnia on menopause: Insomnia can trigger or worsen other health conditions like depression and anxiety, which are common in women going through menopause. If sleep problems continue, it can lead to sleep deprivation and affect your quality of life.

Sleep problems during menopause.

Some of the most common problems with sleep during menopause:

Insomnia

Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disturbances associated with menopause.

Insomnia can be caused by insomnia or other sleep disorders, including anxiety and depression. insomnia is often the result of hormonal changes that causes hot flashes during menopause.

Hot flashes

Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause. They can cause you to feel very warm and uncomfortable, and often occur during the night.

Up to 75% of menopausal women report experiencing hot flashes.[viii] While there is no cure for hot flashes, there are a number of ways to manage them. Some of the most effective treatments include:

  • Taking medications like estrogen or progesterone therapy
  • Using cooling pads or fans to cool down your body
  • Wearing lightweight, breathable clothing
  • Drinking plenty of fluids and avoiding hot drinks and spicy foods

Managing Hot Flashes During Menopause.

Sleep-disordered breathing in menopause

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a condition that causes you to have problems breathing while you sleep. It can lead to insomnia, restless sleep, and daytime fatigue.

Up to 50% of menopausal women report having SDB.[ix] Some common symptoms of SDB include snoring, gasping for air, and feeling tired during the day.

There are a number of treatments available for SDB, including:

  • Lifestyle changes like losing weight or quitting smoking
  • Oral appliances that help keep your airway open
  • Surgery to remove excess tissue in your throat
  • CPAP machine to help you breathe better at night

If you are experiencing sleep problems during menopause, it is important to see your doctor. They can help you determine

Other mood and sleep disorders

Insomnia is just one of the many mood and sleep disorders that can affect women during menopause. Other common disorders include:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Restless leg syndrome
  • Difficulty staying asleep (hypersomnia)
  • Trouble falling asleep (insomnia)
  • Jet lag

Why does menopause cause insomnia?

  • Hormonal changes: Are one of the main reasons why insomnia occurs during menopause. When estrogen levels start to decline, it can cause problems falling or staying asleep.
  • Hot flashes and night sweats can also keep you awake during the night. These symptoms of menopause make insomnia worse, especially if they occur at the same time.
  • Hot flashes: Hot flashes and night sweats can also keep you awake during the night. These symptoms of menopause make insomnia worse, especially if they occur at the same time.
  • Reduction in melatonin: Levels of melatonin naturally decline as you age. But insomnia can also reduce the amount of melatonin in your body.[x] This can make it harder to fall and stay asleep.
  • Mental health problems: Insomnia can trigger or worsen other health conditions like depression and anxiety, which are common in women going through menopause. If sleep problems continue, it can lead to sleep deprivation and affect your quality of life.

Tell me the best way to sleep during menopause?

poor sleep

There is not one definitive answer to this question. The best way to sleep during menopause may vary from woman to woman.

However, some tips that may help include:

  • Establish a regular sleep schedule and stick to it as much as possible
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol before bedtime
  • Get up at the same time every day
  • Exercise regularly, but not right before bedtime
  • Relax before sleep with a warm bath or gentle yoga poses. Avoid stimulating activities like watching TV or checking your phone in the hour leading up to bedtime
  • Sleep on a comfortable mattress and pillows that are appropriate for you

Medical treatments for insomnia during menopause

sleep disturbance

Medical treatments for insomnia during menopause can include prescription or over-the-counter sleep aids. And also:

Hormone replacement therapy is a medication that contains female hormones. You take the medication to replace the estrogen that your body stops making during menopause. Hormone therapy is most often used to treat common menopausal symptoms, including hot flashes and vaginal discomfort

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a type of talk therapy. It helps you identify and change the thoughts and behaviors that keep you from sleeping well. CBT can be an effective treatment for insomnia, especially when it’s combined with medication.

Some foods can improve your sleep. There are a number of foods that can help you sleep better. Some of these include:

  • Tryptophan-rich foods like turkey, chicken, eggs, and cheese
  • Carbohydrates like whole grain toast and oatmeal
  • Bananas
  • Milk
  • Chocolate
  • Valerian root- Valerian is a herb that has been used for centuries to treat insomnia. It can be taken as a supplement or brewed as tea.

Natural therapies

Before starting medical treatment of insomnia during a pause, you should turn to natural methods of treatment.

Create a room suitable for sleeping

Often the room in which you are trying to get some sleep prevents you from doing so. Your sleep can be affected by three main components of the bedroom. Ambient noise, light and temperature.

You can address each of these components by taking the following steps:

  • Address ambient noise by using a noise machine, ear plugs or fans
  • Address light by using blackout curtains or an eye mask
  • Address temperature by using a fan, air conditioner or heater.

If you’re unable to make changes to your bedroom, try sleeping in a different room temporarily. This can help you create a new sleep association and improve your sleep quality.

Avoiding caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol can help insomnia

sleep disorders
  • Caffeine can keep you awake long after drinking it, especially if consumed too close to bedtime
  • Nicotine is a stimulant. It can be hard to sleep if you smoke close to bedtime
  • Alcohol may help you fall asleep, but it reduces the quality of your sleep

Aromatherapy is a natural way to improve sleep quality.

It is the use of essential oils to treat health problems. Aromatherapy can be used to calm the mind and body, which may help you sleep better.

There are many different essential oils that can be used for aromatherapy. Some of the most popular oils for insomnia include:

  • Lavender oil- Lavender oil is known for its relaxing properties. It can be used to calm the mind and body before sleep.
  • Chamomile oil- Chamomile oil is a relaxant that can help you wind down before bed.
  • neroli oil- Neroli oil is a citrus oil that has sedative effects. It can be used to help you sleep.
  • Ylang ylang oil- Ylang ylang is an uplifting and sedating essential oil that can be used to reduce insomnia.
  • Jasmine oil- Jasmine oil is a sedating essential that can be used to promote sleep.

Some foods can improve your sleep

There are a number of foods that can help you sleep better. Some of these include:

  • Tryptophan-rich foods like turkey, chicken, eggs, and cheese
  • Carbohydrates like whole grain toast and oatmeal
  • Bananas
  • Milk
  • Chocolate
  • Valerian root- Valerian is a herb that has been used for centuries to treat insomnia. It can be taken as a supplement or brewed as tea.

Yoga

good night's sleep

There are a number of poses that can help you relax and de-stress before sleep. Gentle yoga may be especially helpful if you’re struggling with insomnia.

Yoga poses to try:

  • Child’s Pose- this pose can help you relax and gently stretch the muscles of your back and neck
  • Puppy Pose- this pose helps lengthen the spine and opens the chest
  • Sphinx Pose- this pose helps open the chest
  • Corpse Pose- this pose helps you relax your muscles and mind. It can be a great way to cool down after a workout.
  • You can also try guided meditations to help you relax before bedtime.

Other factors that can contribute to insomnia

  • Psychological stressors such as anxiety or depression
  • Physical discomfort such as pain from arthritis
  • Environmental factors like noise or light
  • Lack of exercise
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Sleeping pills can have side effects, so talk to your doctor about insomnia treatment options.

Frequently asked questions

What helps with menopause insomnia?

There are a number of treatments that can help insomnia during menopause. These include CBT, medications, foods that improve sleep, and natural therapies. Talk to your doctor about the best treatment for you.

Is insomnia common in menopause?

Insomnia is common in menopause. Approximately 50-70% of women experience insomnia during menopause.

What are the side effects of sleeping pills?

Sleeping pills can have a number of side effects, including daytime drowsiness, dizziness, and headaches. They can also be habit-forming.

Does melatonin help with menopausal insomnia?

Melatonin is a hormone that can help insomnia. It helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle and may be helpful for insomnia during menopause.

Does menopause insomnia go away?

It is possible for insomnia to go away during menopause. However, it is also common for insomnia to persist. Talk to your doctor about the best treatment plan for you.

Can I drink alcohol if I have insomnia?

Alcohol can make insomnia worse. It can interfere with your sleep and cause restless sleep.

Why does menopause cause lack of sleep?

There are a number of factors that can contribute to insomnia during menopause. These include psychological stressors, physical discomfort, environmental factors, and hormonal changes. Talk to your doctor about the best treatment plan for you.

References

  1. https://www.maturitas.org/article/S0378-5122(19)30630-9/fulltext
  2. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/insomnia
  3. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2019.00849/full
  4. https://medlineplus.gov/hormonereplacementtherapy.html
  5. https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/black-cohosh
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