Sleep regression ages
Sleep regression ages

Sleep regression ages

One of the most challenging aspects of being a parent is dealing with sleep regression. This phenomenon, which can strike at any time, can make it difficult for both parents and children to get the rest they need. In this article, we will discuss the different sleep regression ages and what you can do to make the process as smooth as possible for everyone involved.

What is sleep regression?

Baby sleep regression is a normal part of child development. It occurs when a baby or toddler who has been sleeping well suddenly starts to wake up frequently during the night or has difficulty falling asleep. Sleep regressions are often associated with major milestones in a child’s life, such as teething, crawling, or walking. Together with separation anxiety, these two are the most common reasons why babies have trouble sleeping. Separation anxiety is when a baby becomes anxious or scared when they are separated from their parents.

The length of baby sleep regressions vary depending on the cause. Developmental milestones usually only last a few weeks, while changed routines or illnesses can cause longer-term disruptions. However, most sleep regressions will eventually end and your child will return to their normal sleep patterns.

Signs and causes of a sleep regression

Teething in babies

There are a few different signs that can indicate that your child is experiencing a sleep regression. These include:

  • Waking up more frequently during the night
  • Taking shorter naps
  • Becoming cranky or irritable
  • Experiencing a change in appetite

Relatedly, there are a few different causes of sleep regressions. The most common cause is developmental milestones. As your child starts to learn new skills, their brain becomes more active and they may have trouble sleeping as a result.

Another common cause of sleep regressions is changed routine. If your child’s sleep pattern is disrupted by a move, a change in childcare arrangements, or even a holiday, regression may occur. Finally, illnesses can also cause sleep regressions. If your child is teething, has a cold, or is experiencing any other type of discomfort, it can make it difficult for them to sleep through the night.

Types of sleep regression

A baby at eight months old

There are three different types of sleep regression:

  • Phase one sleep regression – This occurs when a baby is transitioning from two naps to one nap. Babies typically experience this regression at around four months old.
  • Phase two sleep regression – This occurs when a baby is transitioning from one nap to no naps. Babies typically experience this regression at around eight months old.
  • Toddler sleep regression – This occurs when a toddler is learning to stay asleep through the night without needing a daytime nap. Toddlers typically experience this regression between 18 and 24 months old.

Sleep regression ages

Now that we have discussed the different types of sleep regression, let’s talk about when they typically occur. As we mentioned earlier, sleep regression happen in association with developmental milestones. Here is a more detailed breakdown of the most common sleep regression ages:

4-week sleep regression

The 4-week sleep regression is the earliest sleep regression. It occurs when a baby’s sleep is transitioning from two naps to one nap. It means they are no longer taking a morning and afternoon nap. Instead, they will only take one long nap during the day.

The first four weeks of sleep regression are usually the most challenging for parents. Babies may start to wake up more frequently during the night and take shorter naps. They may also become cranky or irritable. As a result, you may see a change in their appetite.

4-month sleep regression

The 4-month sleep regression is caused by the transition from two naps to one nap. Most babies will eventually adjust to this new schedule and return to their normal sleep patterns. However, if your baby is having difficulty adjusting, you can try gradually moving their bedtime later or waking them up earlier in the morning.

6-month sleep regression

During a 6-month-old regression, babies usually start to experience difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep through the night. They may also start taking shorter naps during the day. As a result, they may become cranky or irritable. This regression can last anywhere from a few weeks to a few months.

8-month sleep regression

The most common sleep regression is the eight-month sleep regression. This is caused by a change in bedtime routine, including a move or a change in childcare arrangements. It can also be caused by an illness, such as teething or a cold.

Teething is the process of baby teeth coming in. It often starts around six months old, but can start as early as three months or as late as twelve months old. During teething, your baby may have a lot of discomfort. They may drool more than usual, have swollen gums, and be irritable. Teething can also cause a child to have a decreased appetite and difficulty sleeping.

10-month sleep regression

The 10-month sleep regression is less common than the 8-month sleep regression. It is caused by developmental changes, such as learning to walk or talk. Teething also encompasses this period of sleep regression in babies.

2-year sleep regression

Toddlers typically experience a sleep regression between 18 and 24 months old. A 2-year sleep regression means that your toddler is learning to stay asleep through the night without needing a daytime nap. This can be a difficult transition for many toddlers, as they are used to taking a nap during the day. As a result, they may start waking up more frequently during the night and become cranky or irritable.

How will I know it’s a sleep regression?

If your baby is going through a sleep regression, you will likely notice these signs:

Decreased sleep

Your baby may start sleeping less during the day or at night. In addition, your baby may start waking up more often during the night or have difficulty falling back asleep.

Moreover, your baby may start going to bed later or waking up earlier than usual. Or your baby may become more fussy and cry more than usual.

If you notice any of these signs, it is important to talk to your doctor to rule out any other potential causes. Once you have ruled out any other causes, you can begin working on a plan to help your child sleep through the regression.

Increased hunger

Baby drinking formula milk

During a growth spurt, your baby may start to eat more than usual. This can cause them to wake up more frequently at night or have trouble falling asleep.

To help your child through this phase, it is important to continue breastfeeding or give them formula on demand. You should also make sure that they are getting enough sleep during the day so that they are not overtired at night.

If you are formula feeding, you may want to consider investing in a high-quality formula. This formula has been clinically proven to reduce fussiness and crying in babies.

As your baby starts to eat more solid foods, you may also want to increase their intake of iron-rich foods like meats, beans, and spinach.

Extreme crankiness

Extreme crankiness

If your baby is going through a sleep regression, you may notice that they become more fussy and cry more than usual. This is because they are tired and their bodies are growing rapidly.

To help your child through this phase, it is important to maintain a consistent bedtime routine and create a calm environment for them to sleep in. You should also avoid letting them become overtired during the day, as this can make it more difficult for them to sleep at night.

It is also important to continue breastfeeding or giving them formula during this phase, as they will still need an afternoon nap to get the rest they need.

At this age, your baby may also start teething, so you may want to consider investing in a Teething Ring or other types of teething relief product.

More cuddle time

During a sleep regression, your baby may want to be held more often. This is because they are tired and need extra comfort. To help your child through this phase, it is important to hold them when they cry and rock them to sleep.

Additionally, if you’re not sure whether your child is experiencing a sleep regression, try keeping track of how long they are sleeping each night and how many times they wake up throughout the day. This can help you identify any changes in their normal sleep patterns.

How to deal with a sleep regression?

The best way to deal with a sleep regression will vary depending on the cause. If your child is experiencing a developmental milestone, there is not much you can do other than be patient and wait for it to pass.

However, if their sleep regression is due to a changed routine or an illness, there are a few things you can do to help them adjust. First, try to stick to as regular of a schedule as possible. This means keeping bedtimes and wake times consistent even on weekends. Second, make sure your child is getting enough exercise and stimulation during the day. This will help them to tire themselves out before bedtime. Finally, consider using a sleep aid such as a white noise machine or blackout curtains to create a sleep environment that is conducive to sleep.

How long does a sleep regression last?

The length of a sleep regression will vary depending on the cause. Developmental milestones usually only last a few weeks, while changed routines or illnesses can cause longer-term disruptions. However, most sleep regressions will eventually end and your child will return to their normal sleep patterns.

In the meantime, it is important to do what you can to help your child through this difficult phase. By following the tips above, you can make the sleep regression less disruptive for both you and your child.

How to survive a sleep regression?

If you’re experiencing a sleep regression with your baby, here are some tips to help you get through it:

Avoid new sleep crutches

Pacifier used by babies

When babies first start their journey through the world of sleep it can be difficult for them to fall asleep independently without being held by someone or having something to suck on (like a pacifier). These things can become “crutches” that the baby relies on in order to fall asleep – and eventually, they may have trouble sleeping without them. If your baby is using sleep crutches, it’s important to try and wean them off of them gradually so that they can learn to sleep independently.

Remind yourself this will end

The sleep regression is a phase, and it will eventually end. Keep reminding yourself of this to help you through the tough times. In the meantime, do what you can to make it through each day and get some rest when you can. With a little patience and some hard work, you’ll get through it.

Soothe your baby

During a sleep regression, your baby may want to be held more often. This is because they are tired and need extra comfort. It is critical to hold your child when they are crying and soothe them in order to help them get through this stage.

Recognize you’re dealing with a sleep regression

If you’re struggling to deal with a sleep regression on your own, don’t hesitate to ask for help from friends or family members. You can also consult with a pediatrician or sleep specialist if you need additional support.

Conclusion

Sleep regressions are a normal part of development for babies and toddlers. They are bound to occur at some point during your child’s early years. By understanding what to expect and how to handle them, you can make the sleep regression less disruptive for both you and your child. In the meantime, it is important to do what you can to help your child through this difficult phase. By following the tips above, you can make the sleep regression less disruptive for both you and your child.

Frequently asked questions

What are the stages of sleep regression?

The stages of sleep regression vary depending on the cause. Developmental milestones usually only last a few weeks, while changed routines or illnesses can cause longer-term disruptions. However, most sleep regressions will eventually end and your child will return to their normal sleep patterns.

How do I know if my baby is having a sleep regression?

If your baby is having trouble sleeping, it could be because they are going through a sleep regression. Sleep regression is a time when a baby has trouble sleeping because they are going through a change. This might be a new development milestone, or because of an illness or changed routine.

What's the worst sleep regression?

There is no single worst sleep regression. All developmental milestones can potentially disrupt your baby’s sleeping habits to some extent. Some regressions are better than others, but all are temporary.

Sleep regression will change how long a newborn sleeps at night, how often they feed, and how much time they spend awake – typically resulting in interrupted or shortened sleep for both you and the child.

What are the signs of sleep regression?

There are a few signs that your baby may be going through a sleep regression. These include difficulty sleeping, wanting to be held more often, and crying more than usual. If you notice these signs, it’s best to consult with a pediatrician or sleep specialist to help get your baby back on track.

What age do sleep regressions happen?

Common sleep regression ages are during the baby’s first two years, but they can occur at any point during this time and are most common during the first year.

Resources

  1. https://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/sleep/6-month-sleep-regression/#is
  2. https://www.littleones.co/blog/sleep-regressions-the-when-why
  3. https://www.whattoexpect.com/first-year/sleep/sleep-regression/
  4. https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/typical-sleep-behaviour-nb-1-2-years
  5. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/sleep-regression-stages
Share with

Leave a Reply

Start typing and press Enter to search